Blog Tour

Blog Tour: Pirate and R by Daniele Forni

Title: The Pirate and R
Author: Daniele Forni
Genre: Picture Book
Publication Date: 2nd June 2020
Page Count: 30
Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Goodreads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/53666365-the-pirate-and-r 
Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pirate-R-Daniele-Forni/dp/1913340686/
Summary:The Pirate and R is a simple introduction to the statistical software R, specifically aimed at future data scientists.

Got to www.thelittledatascientist.co.uk for more codes to use and to stay up to date regarding future publications.


Why Coding for children?

Why learn how to code? We are surrounded by devices that all run with some sort of code, from your phone to your car. The ability to automate and make tasks scalable has made coding so ubiquitous in our daily lives that we do not even realise that the world could not function without these little-known languages. Nowadays not only the majority of jobs in Silicon Valley, but also in finance, health care and advertisement all require to know how to code. As many of today’s billionaires have shown, this skill can also open the path to very successful entrepreneurial careers. And if you marry coding with data, you create the latest buzzword in the tech community: the Data Scientist.

But why coding is important for children? Below there are 5 simple points:

  1. It is a playground for young minds. Every coding and data problem, whether it is finding a new genetic sequence or predicting the weather tomorrow, is filled with complicated mathematical models and data that you need harmoniously conduct together. Juggling all of these things foster a flexible and logical mind.
  2.  It is like learning a language. R, Python, C++ are called languages because they each have a specific syntax, grammar and styles. The earlier a child is exposed to a language, the easier it is to learn it – you never really forget it! 
  3. It helps understand why math matters. All coding languages at their core is simply math with subtractions, divisions, square roots and multiplications. Seeing first-hand the practical use of algebra and matrices cements these concepts in the brain.
  4. It is based on a collaboration effort. Coders have institutionalised sharing each other’s pieces of code, either through libraries or simply social networks for coders such as www.github.com. You are literally building codes using building blocks from others, like a Lego, and other can take yours if you share it. You can also go online and ask the super helpful coding community for some help on your projects or just for some moral support (www.stackoverflow.com).
  5. It is a very creative endeavour. Coding is all about experimenting: there is never just one solution to a problem. The more complicated the question to answer, the more paths (and solutions) you can find. 

If a child is exposed to coding from a young age not only would have a competitive edge in tomorrow’s market place, but she would also learn skills that can be applied in many other fields, from academia to research. Coding literacy is one of the most important skills for current and future generations to learn.


Author Information

Daniele Forni works as a data scientist and risk manager in banking in London. He has degrees in Economics, International Relations and Languages (English and Mandarin) from universities in the UK and Italy. He has been working in finance for 10 years in Italy, China and the UK. As a data scientist, he is a keen innovation, data and coding enthusiast, and he loves spreading his passions to the younger generations through books and talks. He lives in East London with his beautiful wife and lovely daughter.

 

Website: https://www.thelittledatascientist.co.uk/ 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danieleforni/ 

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